Meet Dr. Neetha Joseph- Scientist at NCMR-NCCS Pune

Dr. Neetha Joseph’s research interest is in microbial systematics, ecology and community analysis. She is affiliated with NCMR-NCCS Pune from last 8 years. She is in-charge of FAME analysis service and curator of Firmicutes. It was a great pleasure to interact with Dr. Neetha and to know more about her as a person and her work.

Kranti: Dr. Neetha, you have worked with coastal environment micro-organisms during your PhD. At a personal level, what motivated you to enter into microbiology research?
Dr. Neetha: Kranti, my native place is in Kerala, a beautiful coastal area in India. Kochi is a lovely place with lot of Backwaters and Estuaries. When I finished my post-graduation, I got an opportunity to join at National Institute of Oceanography (NIO) where most of the research work is related to Ocean and Estuaries. Nutrient enrichment due to various anthropogenic activities is the most widespread problem in estuaries around the world. Significant spatial and temporal variability of physico-chemical and geochemical characteristics and productivity patterns are the important characteristics of estuaries. Microbial communities are involved in mineralization of organic matter; therefore, I was interested in understanding the response of these sedimentary microbial communities to these regional and seasonal changes using signature biomolecules (Phospholipid Fatty Acids – PLFA) as a means of identifying the specific group of microorganisms in the natural ecosystems .

Kranti: Everybody has someone in their life who inspires them to achieve something. Who is your inspiration in science?
Dr. Neetha: My PhD guide at NIO, Kochi is my inspiration in Science. She inspired me a lot! She encouraged me in various aspects of science and helped in boosting my confidence.

Kranti: Which methods and tools you use in your research?
Dr. Neetha: Microbial communities are involved in mineralization of organic matter in estuarine sediment. To understand the response of these microbial communities to various physiochemical and geochemical factors using signature biomolecules (Phospholipid Fatty Acids – PLFA) as a means of identifying the specific group of microorganisms in the natural ecosystems. Phospholipids are mainly found in the cell membrane, not in storage lipids and have a rapid turnover in aquatic sediments. So it provides a measure of viable cellular biomass in an ecosystem.  Different physiological and functional groups of microorganisms in sediments were described using PLFA analysis.
The extracted PLFAs were analyzed using gas chromatography (Agilent 7890 Series, USA) with a cross-linked phenyl – methyl siloxane capillary column (25 m, 0.2 mm) and FID. Identification of the FAMEs was carried out by comparison of retention time and equivalent chain length with known standards like Eukary calibration mixture – 1201A (Eukary6 method, Version: 3.7) and MIDI peak identification software (MIDI Inc., Newark, DE).

Kranti: You are contributing to microbiology related services offered at NCMR Pune. What are those services ?
Dr. Neetha: I am in – charge for FAME analysis service and curator of Firmicutes at NCMR. Under FAME analysis, the bacterial (aerobic and anaerobic) or yeast samples are identified based on their cell membrane fatty acids. Also cell membrane fatty acids are analyzed for novel taxa along with their closely related type strains for publication.

Kranti: Are journals necessary in the age of internet? Don’t you think research should be done not just to publish a paper but also to have real life impacts?  
Dr. Neetha: We know that nowadays we can extract all the information we require via internet. But we cannot compare the beauty of reading a book or journal with internet. Yes, I totally agree that we should do research not only to publish a paper but also to have real life impacts.

Kranti: Being a woman in science, what are the challenges that you’ve faced?
Dr. Neetha: Being a woman in science, the major challenge I face is to manage family, children and their education along with my research work. Another challenge is to get time to spend for research along with my routine services and other commitments.

Kranti: How do you maintain the balance of your family and work-life?
Dr. Neetha: For that I should thank my husband and children for their co-operation and moral support throughout my career.

Kranti: What advice would you like to give to young women who want to pursue research?
Dr. Neetha: If you have an actual interest in science along with sincerity, dedication and hardworking nature, you will be able to succeed in your research career. As a woman, you should be able to manage your time and having patience is also equally important to succeed in your life.

Kranti: Would you share with us any memorable incident/moment of your research life?
Dr. Neetha: In the year 2000, I got an opportunity to participate in Cochin – Alleppey – Mangalore Cruise on board CRV Sagar Paschimi, under DOD, COMAPS Programme. It was a rare experience and golden memory in my research life.

Kranti: Most of the scientist’s children opt for career in science. Do you want your child to become a scientist too? 
Dr. Neetha: Yes, if they are showing real interest in science and research, definitely I will encourage him or her to opt for career in Science.